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change

EN[tʃeɪndʒ] [-eɪndʒ]
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WChange
  • Change, The Change, or Changing may refer to:
FR change
Loose change
Loose change

    Definition of change in English Dictionary

  • NounPLchanges
    1. NC The process of becoming different.
      1. Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.
    2. NU Small denominations of money given in exchange for a larger denomination.
      1. Can I get change for this $100 bill please?
    3. NC A replacement, e.g. a change of clothes.
      1. After beating champions Chelsea 3-1 on Boxing Day, Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger made eight changes to his starting XI in an effort to freshen things up, with games against Birmingham and Manchester City to come in the next seven days.
    4. NU Money given back when a customer hands over more than the exact price of an item.
      1. A customer who pays with a 10-pound note for a £9 item receives one pound in change.
    5. NU Coins (as opposed to paper money).
      1. Do you have any change on you? I need to make a phone call.
    6. NC A transfer between vehicles.
      1. The train journey from Bristol to Nottingham includes a change at Birmingham.
    7. (baseball) A change-up pitch.
      1. (campanology) Any order in which a number of bells are struck, other than that of the diatonic scale.
        1. (dated) A place where merchants and others meet to transact business; an exchange.
          1. (Scotland, dated) A public house; an alehouse.
          2. VerbSGchangesPRchangingPT, PPchanged
            1. VI To become something different.
              1. The tadpole changed into a frog.   Stock prices are constantly changing. ‎
            2. VT (ergative) To make something into something different.
              1. Of all the transitions brought about on the Earth’s surface by temperature change, the melting of ice into water is the starkest. It is binary. And for the land beneath, the air above and the life around, it changes everything.
            3. VT To replace.
              1. Ask the janitor to come and change the lightbulb.   After a brisk walk, I washed up and changed my shirt. ‎
            4. VI To replace one's clothing.
              1. You can't go into the dressing room while she's changing.   The clowns changed into their costumes before the circus started. ‎
            5. VI To transfer to another vehicle (train, bus, etc.).
              1. (archaic) To exchange.
                1. VT To change hand while riding (a horse).
                  1. to change a horse
              2. More Examples
                1. Used in the Middle of Sentence
                  • The food got a lot worse after the restaurant changed hands.
                  • I was unprepared for the change in attire and started slightly when the alectryomancer reappeared.
                  • Increases in the proportion of early breast cancer patients and the wide adoption of oncoplastic surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy may have contributed to these observed changes in surgical trends.
                2. Used in the Beginning of Sentence
                  • Changes in oscillatory CSF flow at the craniovertebral junction were demonstrated on dynamic phase-contrast MRI by Dujovny, et al.
                  • Changes in colonic topography during the herniation and postherniation period.
                  • Change in acceptance of feedback by adding information based on qualitative analysis p =0.956: comparison of study group and nonstudy group within after routine feedback.
                3. Used in the Ending of Sentence
                  • World leaders have repeatedly stated that we must act on climate change.
                  • Please readd me to your contact list; my ICQ number has changed.
                  • When the Katie came through, the town's entire economy and culture changed.
              • Part-of-Speech Hierarchy
                1. Nouns
                  • Countable nouns
                    • Singularia tantum
                      • Uncountable nouns
                    • Verbs
                      • Ergative verbs
                        • Intransitive verbs
                          • Transitive verbs
                        Related Links:
                        1. fr change
                        2. fr changes
                        3. en changes
                        4. en changeable
                        5. fr changeable
                        Source: Wiktionary
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                        Meaning of change for the defined word.

                        Grammatically, this word "change" is a noun, more specifically, a countable noun and a singularia tantum. It's also a verb, more specifically, an ergative verb, an intransitive verb and a transitive verb.
                        Difficultness: Level 1
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                        Easy     ➨     Difficult
                        Definiteness: Level 9
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                        Definite    ➨     Versatile